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GDPR for Better or Worse?

GDPR for Better or Worse?

GDPR for Better or Worse?

What are the pro’s and con’s of GDPR? Is it profitable online?

GDPR discussed, introduced in 2016 and enforced May 25th, 2018 by the European Union, has definite for better or worse affects and issues short and long-term.

GDPR is the long-awaited initiative of the European Union and Commission to bring some ‘voice‘, regulation or control over or against the mighty powers or some would say monopolies of a few U.S. conglomerates in online search, e-commerce, multimedia, multi-channel trade and trading.

I personally think the European Union has been playing catch-up of how the WWW, Internet or online world, really works. I have actually sent emails for over 5 years, had few discussions with representatives of the EU concerning fair-trade across the WWW and Internet. I know first-hand the European Union means well, and have invested BILLIONS through various European Commission and Union initiatives, as they believe the Digital Single Market could contribute around 415 BILLION Euros to the European economy.

GDPR could be seen as a major EU or European move to regulate, control, divide the traditional norms [if such exist], enforce privacy, fair-trade and balance to the WWW and Internet. Regardless of one’s views for better or worse short or long-term, one thing for sure GDPR has definitely got the attention of not just online giants like Google, Facebook, Twitter and Amazon but EVERY serious or responsible webmaster, website, blog or e-commerce platform on the planet. That is also equal to every serious entrepreneur, business, institution or organization worldwide in any culture or language online. This has to be applauded, so let’s get into the for better:

  • GDPR at heart will and shall address rights-to-be-forgotten and e-privacy throughout countries of the EU and potentially the world.

  • GDPR definitely echoes a huge voice with legal powers of international law enforcement online and offline.

  • When you see Facebook and Google bow or sit when the European Union or Commission calls or legislates, this is unprecedented or literally unusual in over a decade.

  • GDPR organizes, montiors and enforces a plethora of laws, rights, responsibilities and actions EVERY serious online website, blog, business or entrepreneur must comply or face up to 2% of your annual profits plus heavy legal costs and damaged online reputation.

  • GDPR is more than a speeding ticket or court fine, it is a daily administrative management and responsibilty of tasks one previously could ignore how one use’s cookies, email, autoresponder or online consent but not anymore.

  • GDPR covers International Data Transfers this is why the BILLION DOLLAR online giants are paying attention. The days of collecting business or personal information and doing whatever ie. sell, exchange, store or compete against, are pretty much over worldwide. This is good news, as many people may not know data breaches in just 2018 have affected Yahoo, e-Bay, Equifax and the one that broke the data-breach camels back or was unforgettable, Facebook. So imagine the data breaches over the last decade? To online professionals and Zuckerberg a hacker himself, the use and art of ‘hacking’ is a 9-5 hire of the best, no different to recruiting the best soldiers or team for battle or daily anti-virus, anti-bot or anti-competition defence or enforcement online or across devices.

  • GDPR definitely throws the online world into EU Regulation and for once the EU is truly at the forefront of online, international trading laws, privacy protection and anti-competitive fair-trade online. This needs to also be applauded, as it has taken over a decade to research, learn, legislate and gather anti-competitive insight resulting in lawful enforcement action worldwide.

  • GDPR is a powerful protective force across many industries, business roles & responsibilities, consumer experiences and personal protection online and offline.

The Worse:

  • GDPR lacks in many areas how the ‘real‘ world of online business, SEO, PPC, e-commerce operates. I.e. Most websites and webmasters are now forced to display GDPR compliance pop-ups or banners [homepage] to gain immediate acceptance or rejection of ‘cookie consent use‘ which has to be done, but will have major disruption, more negative engagement, bounce-rates, conversion and sales effect’s. There must be a better way without having to disrupt landing pages, engagement, conversion or sales process.

  • GDPR legislators appears to lack how sensitive the online sales, conversion or landing page science or process really is. The world-wide-web may look colossal and a few online giants earning BILLIONS, but for the majority the 90% of small businesses FAIL online. Just like the giants online, it took them 10 years on average to become successful, nothing has changed. GDPR will make this a much longer boot-strap or fatal profit, scaling experience. Will GDPR make profit or success online for better or worse? I think worse, if obtaining user or visitor consent remains a homepage pop-up or banner click.

  • GDPR legislation has to take into consideration if the average website visitor spends 1-10 seconds in average attention or decision, GDPR consent could take up to 50-100% of that CRUCIAL sales process time and experience overnight.

  • GDPR potentially is a goldmine for hackers, when one stores personal data on any URL, WordPress, add-on or plugin. Not even your own private PC, lap-top or smartphone is private or inaccessible to others. GDPR potentially opens the safe or vault to hackers, bots, phishing and more areas of the ‘underworld’ GDPR has perhaps not yet known or in-depth considered.

  • GDPR to some extent is IMPOSSIBLE for 99.9% of Data Protection Officer or agents, to lock, vault or protect consumer data, when from the outset most websites need a add-on, plugin or software of a third-party who equally or more powerfully has access to consumer consent and rejection cookies data.

  • GDPR could cost a fortune in legal bills not just from a EU fine should it arise, but legal lawsuits of angry, dissatisfied consumers worldwide. One must never forget, if the law gives the power to sue and win with a pay-out or profit, some people will apply.

  • GDPR requires more than use of cookie consent it requires one maintains a record of cookies list, personal data stored and user access to this data. Which for Infogurushop.Com I have decided to rewrite and place a DATA ERASURE image as proof of such user consent tool exists on my Privacy Policy page, to further comply with GDPR compliance. Yet, still how does one know if your 100% compliant?

Please visit the GDPR information links above, leave any comments, share, like and Thanks for reading.

Paul Branson aka Infogurushop.Com

Further Reading:

Read what Jimmy Wales and Tim Berners-Lee says about GDPR

How to Leverage GDPR Email Metrics Post GDPR

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